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     Evening Performances
     6:30 to 9:00 pm at IGNCA Amphitheatre

 

tuesday 9th march at 6.30 pm

Name of the play: Once Upon A Time – Manipuri Theatre

Synopsis

    The story revolves around the life of a young girl whose mother dies while giving birth. Although her father loves her deeply, her life is made miserable by the abusive and cruel behaviour of her step-mother. Once, when her father is away, her step-mother inflicts such violence on her that she is almost crippled. Just then she is rescued by a flock of birds and carried away to a distant land. When her father returns and finds her daughter missing he takes his wife and goes to the goddess Nongthang Leima (the lightning lady) to pray for her return. While at the temple the step-mother, for the first time in her life, starts experiencing the emotions and feelings of a mother. Filled with remorse, she is transformed and begins a new life.
 

Cast 
1.
Maibi (Priestess): H. Sabitri
2. Step Mother:  Puspanjali Parasar
3.
Stepdaughter: Radhika Rabha
4.
Father: Rupjyoti Mahanta
5.
Birds: S. Bembem,  Bijay Rabha, P.Tyson 
6.
Ritual Attendants: Jyoti Rabha, S. Bembem, Malika Khakhalary, Dhananjoy Rabha,P. Tyson, Radhika Rabha, S. Brojen, S. Bimol, Th. Muhindro, A. Upendro, H. Tomba 

Costume & Set
: N. Jadumani
Light
: G. Koken & Bidyutjit Chakraborty
Concept & Direction
: H. Kanhailal

 About the Group:

   Established in 1969 with Heisnam Kanhailal as founder-director the main objective was to study, revive and project the culture of Manipur through the art of theatre and to set the highest standards of performance both in the country but on the world theatre scene.

   As at Kalakshetra we believed in the notion of a workshop that is a laboratory or research theatre rather than a production company. The group began its experiment in a continuous process of renewal of ‘ancestral tradition’ for a contemporary cultural expression as they are all the progeny of an ethno-social tradition of Manipur.

   The artists of the group endeavoured to learn afresh the native lore travelling throughout Manipur and strengthened their creative will. Tamnalai, Kabui-Keioiba, Pebet Memoirs of Africa, Migi Sharang (Human Cage), Draupadi, Kangkhathang (The Unused Sword) and Dakghar are some of its prestigious productions.

 About the Director 

  Seventy years old Heisnam Kanhailal is active in theatre for past 45 years as a playwright, actor and director. Founder director of Kalakshetra Manipur, he is in the vanguard of the experimental theatre movement for the past three decades. He has been attempting to discover an alternative theatre using the rich Manipur traditional performing arts and culture as spring board. He has written 15 plays and directed 35. He has conducted actor training workshops all over the country and also worked with international theatre groups. He has conducted projects for formulation of a new actor training methodology. He is a recipient of the State Award for Theatre and the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for stage direction.He received the Padmashri in 2003 from the Government of India.

This programme is being organized in collaboration with the Sangeet Natak Akademi, Delhi

 

 

 

tuesday 9th march at 8.00 pm
PEOPLE OF THE PACIFIC- An Ancestral Musical Journey through Polynesia’ by The Kahurangi Maori Dance Theatre of New Zealand

Under the influence of Christianity the use of musical instruments declined rendering most traditional music vocal. There are 2 categories of songs. Recitatives: welcoming ceremonies, dances without weapons, incantations and spells. And Songs including Poi (accompanied by a women’s dance), song-poetry, love songs and laments.

Maori dance is called ‘Posture Dance’ and is vigourous and rhythmical for the male dancers and graceful for women dancers. The Haka was danced without weapons and could express a variety of emotions, joy, anger, and sorrow requiring exceptional rhythmical skill In contrast the war dances were danced with the use of spears, clubs or other weapons and required a lot of stamping, chest slapping and facial distortions. The Haka poi performed by women is the most graceful of all Polynesian dances.

The Maori had a habit of composing songs and haka to mark incidents which, by European standards, would appear trivial in themselves. Elsdon Best lists haka composed for such reasons as — Reception of native visitors, reception of Government officials, an insulting remark made by a tribesman, ill-treatment of a woman married to a member of another tribe and a faithless wife.

The Kahurangi Maori Dance Theatre is a dynamic indigenous company employing outstanding young Maori composers and choreographers whose work in song, chant and haka - war dance - reflects the vibrancy and energy of the Ngati Kahungunu tribe.

Artistes:
ELLISON MIHIROA TOMOANA HUATA
KIRSTEN CARISSA TE WAI-MARIE KAPEA
SARAH MATCHITT
KIMBERLEY TE-AWHI JONES
THOMAS PAREKURA COLLINS
TAURU JOHNSTON
AARON BOYDIE MAUI
 


 

Maori War Dance - 19th century illustration

 

 


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