Events
   
   
  Home
About Us
Calendar
Events
Locations
Support
Photo Gallery
Press
Contact
     Evening Performances
     6:30 to 9:00 pm at Siri Fort Main Auditorium

wednesday 25th  february at 6.30 pm

 

 Journey To The Sacred
A Bharata Natyam
performance by
Rama Vaidyanathan

Choreographed and Presented by RAMA VAIDYANATHAN

Music composition by G.S.RAJAN
Musical Ensemble ; Nattuvangam - K. Sivakumar
Vocal - Sudha Raghuraman
Mridangam -Sumod Sridhar
Flute - G.S.Rajan

Bharata Natyam is the dance form now associated with Tamil Nadu but in reality includes all forms of dance and dance dramas which are in accordance with the shastras as laid down by the sage Bharata.. In Tanjore, Kanchipuram and other districts of Tamil Nadu however many talented Devadasis dedicated themselves to the services of the temple as dancers and Bharata Natyam as a composite, solo dance form was born. It combines the art of the stage, drama, music, poetry, colour and rhythm, its message is not only to the senses but to the soul of the dancer and the perceiver. It is an art that is meant primarily for spiritual expression.  

This form of dance is intended to portray all the characters of the epics, the Mahabharata, the Ramayana and the Puranas and through these stories, give to the world a whole philosophy of life and of every kind of human experience. There is no more temple dancing today but at its best the dancer can bring the spirit of the temple to the stage.  

 To understand Bharata Natyam one has to understand music, the movement of the limbs the language of gesture (hastas), rhythm (tala) as executed by the feet, poetry as sung by the musicians and most importantly expression (bhava). The expression in this case is the inner experience of an intense, uplifting emotion.  

Concentrating on its spiritual aspect one must not forget its tremendous visual and auditory appeal. It is both  subtle and sophisticated, dynamic and earthy. The basic postures are balanced positions with stretches that give it a linear quality. The style projects an amazingly equal measure of beauty and strength, of the slow and the fast, of pure dance and mime.

Rama Vaidyanathan is one of India's outstanding Bharata Natyam dancers. She has trained intensively under the legendry dancer Yamini Krishnamurty and under the guidance of the eminent Guru Saroja Vaidyanathan.

While being deeply rooted in the traditional form she has evolved her own individual style and is a thinking dancer willing to attempt newer themes. She will portray this evening some of the main concepts of this festival which will cover the fields of AUM the sacred sound, SRICHAKRA the sacred symbol, BRINDAVAN the sacred site and the sacred space within all of us expressed in a shloka from the Skanda Purana "Aham Brahmasmi" or I AM THAT.

SACRED SPACE - A verse from the Skanda Purana speaks of the sacred space within us, when the jeevatma experiences the presence of the Paramatma.

 

 wednesday 25th  february at 8.00 pm  

Choir Acapella
a performance by Cosmic Voices from Bulgaria
 

 

Singers: CHEKERDEKOVA DARINA VLAEVA , PETROVA NEVENA GEORGIEVA , PRISADOVA BOYKA ILIEVA ,FILIPOVA MARGARITKA ILIEVA , KASTELOVA SNEZHANA EMILOVA , STOYNEVA ALBENA BOYANOVA ,YORDANOVA ANNA YORDANOVA ,TODOROVA MARIYA BOGDANOVA ,VESELINOVA MARIANA TZVETANOVA ,KURTYAN VESELINA STEFANOVA ,GREKOVA KATYA ,EORGIEVA ,NIKOLOVA NIKOLETA YOTOVA, DIMITROVA SILVIA PETROVA ,CHAKAROVA SONYA GEORGIEVA TENEVA DIANA YORDANOVA ,DOYCHEVA DENITSA PETROVA ,TSVETANOVA YANITSA LIUDMILOVA GORCHEVA PAVLINA ASPARUHOVA  

Conductor - Vania Moneva    

 

Although it had existed for centuries, the world only discovered the Bulgarian female choral singing tradition in the late 1980s. The polyphonic and diaphonic harmonies were indeed mysterious, kept alive in the country's mountainous villages where people had moved when the Ottoman Turks invaded the country. The overall sound is more ancient than the Western European ideal of bel canto, and some believe this rawer sound was once more widespread across the continent. Its isolation in the more remote regions of Bulgaria has helped preserve both the style and the local language.

It is a true folk tradition, one with several regional variations, although it's one that's largely always been female. The songs may be solo pieces or the full choir but always with a strong history of diaphonic singing, a two and sometimes three-part harmony. Although the harmonies are now generally modern, manufactured constructs, the effect  is still breathtaking, sounding as ancient and ghostly as the mountains where the music began.

Under Communism, the government formed and funded folk choirs to help create a national musical identity (an initiative common in Eastern Bloc countries). The Cosmic Voices Choir was founded in 1994 by the producer Emil Minev and conductor Vania Moneva and is one of the most popular Bulgarian Folk Choirs today. The group performs from the rich musical tradition of their country – a cross between the European and the  the East European  and containing within itself the cultural influences of the ancient Balkan tribes.

The melodic foundation of Bulgarian music is formed by a complex amalgam of Middle Eastern makams (modes), regional microtonal structures, pentatonic scales, diatonic modes, and major and minor collections and it is these techniques and the unique harmonic vocabulary that gives Bulgarian music a sound so different from Western singing. 

The "Cosmic Voices from Bulgaria" choir presents for the first time in India the mysterious sound of the Balkans, a sound full of sacred atmosphere and spirituality that bears the culture and the spirit of the ancient Slavonic, Bulgarian and Thracian tribes.

 

                                                                                                                           Back